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Borile B450 Scrambler


Posted on October 18th, by Scott in Classic, Scrambler. 9 comments

Written by Ian Lee.

I’ve always been a fan of scrambler bikes. This has been in part thanks to a couple of 1960’s period motorbike mags I have in my collection. Hard-jawed scrambler riders riding their bikes at impossible angles, safe in the knowledge their ‘state of the art’ cork helmets will give them protection should they need it. One modern day bike builder is channeling the spirit of those original trials type bikes, but putting some new age reliability into his offerings. Based in the town of Vò Euganeo, Borile is a boutique bike workshop, producing small volume models in their range – so there is no chance of pulling up next to one at a set of lights. Today’s feature bike is the B450 scrambler, Borile’s first bike to utilise the new 450cc engine, containing componentry supplied by Ducati. And it’s a brilliant tribute to the scramblers of old.

Starting with a frame fashioned from high strength steel tubing, Borile have created a scrambler style profile. Nestled in the frame sits a 452cc thumper, the top end using the same parts as fitted to the Ducati Desmodue model, mated to a Borile bottom end. The 2 valve head contains a belt driven SOHC, the bore is 98mm x 60mm, and the compression is 12:1 on this thumpin’ special. Lubrication is wet sump, the oil fed through a trochoidal pump.

This classic looking bike is helped in reliability by being fuel injected, running a 40.5mm throttle body, with a digital electronic ignition system fitted. Power is relayed through the multiplate clutch, to the removable 6 speed transmission, giving a top speed of 158kmh.

For handling, the bike is fitted with hydraulic 41mm forks at the front, giving 140mm of travel. At the rear sit hydraulic adjustable units, allowing for different options in relation to rebound and preload. The bike rolls on a 100/90×19″ tyre at the front, and 130/80×18″ rubber at the rear. Braking ability is thanks to the twin piston hydraulic disc setup front and rear, running 260mm and 210mm rotors respectively.

Aesthetically, the bike wouldn’t look out of place at a 60s bike meet. A high set exhaust, pointing skyward with a chrome silencer, allows for better than average clearance. With a wheelbase of 1370mm, the bike gives the ability to manouevre while still giving stability at higher speeds. Helping with the weight distribution on this machine is the fact that the fuel tank is under the seat.

Inspired by the roads surrounding the town of Vò Euganeo, Borile has spent a quarter of a century building bikes that are functional and reliable, as well as attractive to the eye. For that 60s look, with reliability built in you would be hard pressed going past this boutique bike builder. Borile’s website sums it up best when they describe their bikes as having ‘qualities that are worthy of a product that is truly hand made in Italy’.





  • Zundap

    I’ll bet it rides as nice as it looks. ..Z

  • itsmefool

    Love, love, love it! Its capabilities and the details really put it over the top for me; congrats, Borile. Job well done!

  • Scrambled

    This ticks all the right boxes for me. A classic look matted with modern technology. Above all, agile, which is what befits a true scrambler. Take note, Triumph and Ducati!

    That reverse cylinder configuration is fascinating; these types of retro bikes tend to have engines that are reliable and pleasing to the eye, but technologically uninteresting. It reminds me of the engine of the 2014 Yamaha YZ450F (the cylinder also seems to be slightly slanted back, but I can’t see for sure from the photos), although the history of this type of engine configuration goes way back.

  • Randy Singer

    Love it! Clearly this bike is heavily inspired by the ’69 Ducati 450 Scrambler.

  • Guest

    Some years back, Borile built a CR500 using a GM top end on a Borile bottom. If I remember correctly

  • bartsky

    Wonderful bike…I’d call it an Enduro…shame that this style/type of bike is no longer offered by the main line mocos in north America. I suspect they’d sell a lot of them.

    • Blake Proudfoot

      This type of bike is most certainly sold currently, if we are to call it an enduro(drz,xl’s, etc.) The style however is a completely different matter, and I couldn’t agree more in that respect.

  • Chris Saddler Sam

    i love the idea… and the looks… except the aesthetics of the engine!
    :)
    who knows… maybe it works perfectly…
    but wtf…
    why not “installing” it with some degrees of inclination?
    it would really look a lot better!
    ;)

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