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Throttle Roll 2015


Posted on May 14, 2015 by Scott in Bobber, Brat, Café Racer, Classic, Event. 8 comments

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Words Pete Cagnacci | Photos by MyMediaSydney

The growing juggernaut that is Throttle Roll was on again for it’s 3rd year, along with it’s sacred mantra; amalgamate Sydney’s colourful bike community and showcase it’s unique builds. Music, food and booze are of course essentials in this holy event.

The day starts early, with 300+ riders meeting up at Harry’s café De Wheels. Coffee was being poured down throats as everyone poured over each other’s bikes. The excitement for the day was high and it was time for the ride. The crew headed off south to the Royal National Park, with more riders joining on the way. Soon the group swelled to 500+ bikes. There was now a mass of exhaust and a thunderous roar heading down the Sea Cliff Bridge. It’s always a tough task keeping together such a large number of bikes, often peeling off into several groups, but there’s a ride leader, markers, tail gunners and support vehicles. The battalion of bikes all gathered at Bald Hill car park, soaking up the sun before making the pilgrimage back up to Enmore for the main event. Park up, drink up, and party.

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There was a bike of every flavour lining the streets; necks were sore from the abundance of machines rolling in, it seemed endless. Walking into the event was the crowning glory however, with 3 levels of 50 amazing bikes from about every style and manufacturer lining the walls. Throttle Roll in its uniqueness manages to provide something for all, without trying to impress anyone. From the oldest, greyest bikers to young families and others that don’t even ride found themselves drawn in to see what the fuss was about. With such amazing food being cooked, a steady supply of beer, and band upon band playing what really is “live” music, it’s impossible to not be drawn in to this celebration of custom.

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Many people walking by often enquired what was happening on this packed out street, and were always surprised when their answer of “how much is this event?” was to be met with “it’s free!” The set up, and on the day maintenance of such a huge celebration cannot be done without all the people that make the custom scene so full of life. People were helping in droves throughout the week, united by the same passion. This shows throughout the weekend as it becomes clear this event is treated with the same passion, creativity and hard work that conceived all of these bikes.

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It wouldn’t be a free custom bike event, without giving away a free custom bike. The legends at Sol Invictus donated a Mercury Café Racer, custom built by The Rising Sun Workshop to be given away to one lucky attendee. This luck fell on the young shoulders of D’Arcy Rankine, who (naturally) was pretty bloody chuffed at such an impressive prize.

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Other players have made invaluable contributions in the custom community, including Levi’s, Shannons, Ducati, Yamaha, MCA, Victory, Moto Guzzi, Sol Invictus, My Media Sydney and Deus. Throttle Roll has become such an event that many of the bikes are purpose built for it. Any excuse to start translating ideas to paper, then to steel and finally the road is evident in the builders that make this event possible. Once the event is over, many will get started on their next creation.

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  • Pete NYC

    Looks like a great event. More on Guzzi #303 w/green fairing please! Stunning!

  • Bultaco Metralla

    Bugger having to work

  • am going to start growing rust and sell it on ebay

    • James Sinclair

      but is your rust as gourmet as ours???

    • Hardley T Whipsnade III

      Good one ! An apposite response with the perfect balance of satire and sarcasm !

      And in answer to your questioner James Sinclair . Trust me JS . All rust is created equal . The real question being ; ” Is it better to burn out . Than to fade/rust away ? ” Personally ? I’ll go for burn out .

  • Hardley T Whipsnade III

    Well . It certainly looks like a good show and all . A few genuine stand out bikes even . But to be honest the proliferation of shows like this and their relentless focus on the past of late is seriously beginning to concern me . Why is simple and best summarized by the quote by French philosopher Jacques Ellul

    ” A society , group or entity focused and consumed with the past . Is a society , group or entity intent on decay ”

    One then needing to ask . Since when did ‘ decay ‘ suddenly become hip and fashionable ?

    • It’s a natural response to 60 years of rampant consumerism. New. More. Bigger. Better. You could also argue that up until very recently, pretty much every new motorcycle was ignoring the fact that if you didn’t like sports bikes or poor Harley copies, you were pretty much screwed. Up until a month ago and the appearance of the Scrambler, my local Ducati showroom was just a whole bunch ‘nope’…

      • I’m with Andrew to a degree.
        i feel like the “past” is relatively limited in the grand scheme of time, at least as far as motos go. There was a long time where there were only pioneers. The new territories are harder to reach now that they’ve been explored. I’m not saying that there are no pioneers now, but sometimes the ragged edge of the unknown isn’t as appealing as the history that’s already become a part of you.