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IMMODEST MOUSE. Bad Winners Think Big With A Suzuki GN125


Posted on August 8, 2017 by Andrew in Brat, Scrambler. 28 comments

Sometimes it’s the simple things that you keep going back to. You buy yourself a new leather jacket, but somehow you end up riding in your old, worn one. You splash out on an expensive watch, and yet you always find yourself wearing your Dad’s old beater. It’s the same with bikes. Something a little understated can mean there’s no stress about it getting stolen or landing you in jail; you can just enjoy the ride. That’s probably why France’s Bad Winners made this; it’s a nimble little Suzuki GN125 that’ll eat up city streets while the big toys can be kept clean for those special Sundays.

As with the shop’s other small capacity builds, they are also targeted directly at younger riders who, at least in some parts of Europe, don’t need a full licence to buy and ride a bike of this capacity. Of course, this area of the bike scene is currently full to overflowing with scooters, but who in their right mind would choose an overly-plasticised step-through when they could have this?

While Bad Winners make these Suzi GNs as a ‘serie’, this particular bike was sourced locally in France for a German customer. And in quite the u-turn from their previous GN, this one’s racing-striped blue tank and Avon Roadrider rubber means that off-road scrambles will be few and far between, with urban asphalt its preferred terrain.

So what do you get for your hard-earned if you fronted Bad Winner’s Northern Paris studio with the cash in your hand? ‘You get the best of both worlds,” says Bad boy Walid. “There’s Plenty of customisation options to make it your own, but you’re also getting an original bike that’s been proven already. There’s no trial and error here; all the bugs have been ironed out”.

Donor Suzukis are stripped to component parts before a full engine rebuild is undertaken, allowing the bike’s new owner a 1 year guarantee. That alone is probably worth the price of admission, but the Bad Winners team doesn’t stop there. A whole raft of custom parts are then fabbed up and then powder coated, along with any original parts that need matching.

Meanwhile, a brand new seat is stitched together. In this case, a classic-looking loaf with a good amount of padding will be cushioning the new owner comfortably. And the original factory tank is then de-badged and resprayed. Walid tells us that if you ask him nicely and commit to the Limited Edition package, you’ll even get to have the tank pretty much any way you’d like it.

With the components back from paint and the last stretch in sight, the bike is fully rewired and then equipped with a slew of Motogadget items, including their Tiny Speedo, M-Unit control box and M-Switch buttons. Finishing touches on the Suzuki read like any biker’s Xmas list: a classic Megaton exhaust, a Bates headlight, Renthal ’bars and new LED lights on the indicators and at the rear.

Bad WinnersFacebook – Instagram | Photos by Guillaume Petranto ]








  • Andy Rappold

    Aaaaw…I always had a soft spot for these. Well, its not really a rebuild when you paint some things,wrench motogadget items on it and put an ebay seat on but this little bike is solid as it gets and a looker! Definitively better than a scooter.
    I wonder where the”whole raft of custom parts”are, though?

    • AJ

      I think it’s great to see shops going for builds aimed at younger/newer riders – I guess part and parcel of targeting that demographic is limiting the scope of the rebuild to keep things affordable. Also my guess is most of these folks won’t have any other bikes in the garage (or even have a garage?) so it needs to do everything – meaning limited scope for radical changes. Great wee bike anyway, wish I’d learned on something this cool.

      • Don’t discount the bike as something a more experienced rider could use to just bomb around on. If you don’t have a massive daily commute or you work from home, something like this would be great to run errands or go to the shops on.

        • AJ

          Not in the slightest! I get around day-to-day on a RE 350 bullet, which isn’t much of a step up from this in terms of power. Most of my riding is inner city stuff and it’s perfect for that. It’s more just that (as someone who learned to ride on 125s not all that long ago) it really makes me glad to see opportunities for less experienced/younger folks to get involved in the scene.

    • Al

      Must be a small ‘raft’.

    • Point taken. There’s probably more aftermarket parts than actual customisation. And a whole bunch of cleaning up, too…

  • Dave Coetzee

    I also think these guys are onto a good thing here. Love this more street version, addition to their recent scrambler.
    Makes my 2 x 125cc, 36 year-old Suzuki seem quite powerful (Lol) https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9ba6d1dfb84d409802ca91f38404cf5e8b2255a69a2fd1c619b5303f00a6976c.jpg

  • Al

    Look at that…a real motorcycle that can be ridden in any weather.

    • It’s a miracle! 😉

    • guvnor67

      Depends on your perspective I guess.. . My daily hack is a rigid, high-barred Shadow 750 (I don’t own a car anymore), that only gets left home if the weather is so bad 10 yards is a nightmare. I have a F650GS for those days. A mate of mine years ago had a BSA M20 for a daily, and a Triton for weekends. .

      • Al

        You are a dying breed ⛄

        • guvnor67

          And getting older and more decrepit by the day!!

          • Al

            and wiser!

          • Andy Rappold

            and more bald.

          • Al

            it can’t get balder than bald…

          • guvnor67

            My misses would probably argue that one!!

        • No.1 sign you are getting old: your first thought when you see a new bike is ‘how comfortable would it be?’

      • the watcher

        Good man! I too have no car (never have had) and count 35 Brit winters on the road. Year round riding improves the skills more than anything else and inures you to the cold. Eventually.

        • Al

          Woooooooow

          • the watcher

            Knew you’d be impressed!

        • guvnor67

          I think you’re right. Though, as I work in Cold Storage (-21 degs C the coldest), some days I question the sanity of it all. Then, when you pull up next to a car full of screaming rug rats, queued in traffic, well. . .!