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MAGNI MAGNIFICO. An MV Agusta Brutale Racer From Magni Motorcycles


Posted on September 8, 2017 by Andrew in Racer. 23 comments

Written by Marlon Slack.

It’s easy to get cynical about custom motorcycles. Sure, they nearly always look good, but they often sacrifice some things in order to get a certain stance or aesthetic just first-class social media coverage. So there’s nothing that brings us more joy than showing you this – an astonishing MV Agusta Brutale engine modelled after a late 60’s GP Winning 500cc triple done by Itay’s legendary Magni Motorcycles.

To understand the significance of this build and the legacy behind Magni you need to look at the history of its founder, Arturo Magni. For years he’d been the team manager at MV Agusta and under his tutelage managed to chalk up an astonishing array of world titles throughout the 1960’s and 70’s.

The softly spoken, focused and thoroughly un-Italian seeming Arturo had an incredible impact on chassis and engine design for MV Agusta that helped propel Giacomo Agostini and later, Phil Read (and many notable others) to a slew of competition victories. The tight-lipped, level-headed Arturo left MV after they left racing in 1976 and formed his own company, Magni.

Magni became a performance-oriented boutique bike shop that gained obsessive fans throughout the world. They designed exceptional frames built to hold whatever engine that Arturo held in high esteem – whether it be a big block Moto Guzzi, a torquey R-series BMW, or a four cylinder Honda or Suzuki.

In 2015 Arturo passed away, heading off to the great workshop in the sky to give Jesus some pointers on frame design. The reins passed to his sons, chiefly Giovanni, who had worked under his guidance for many years.

The ultimate seal of approval?

The first build done without the supervision of their father was crafted around an inline four, designed as a homage to the classic bikes that their father worked towards in the 1960’s. But MV Agusta fans weren’t too pleased. How could someone build an inline four, and claim it’s a tribute to one of the most quintessential triples of all time?

“We chose the MV Brutale 800cc 3 cylinder engine because it represents the history of my father”.

The next time around the team decided to start with a triple – the emotional beating heart of the Magni name. ‘We chose the MV Brutale 800cc 3 cylinder engine because it represents the history of my father,’ Giovanni says. ‘When you mention MV Agusta everyone thinks of him. And the idea was to produce a new model that can celebrate the work he did from 1950 until 1974.’

The next time around the team decided to start with a triple – the emotional beating heart of the Magni name. ‘We chose the MV Brutale 800cc 3 cylinder engine because it represents the history of my father,’ Giovanni says. ‘When you mention MV Agusta everyone thinks of him. And the idea was to produce a new model that can celebrate the work he did from 1950 until 1974.’

That record included 75 world championships across all classes and 37 rider titles.

“We wanted to produce a bike that appears old and original but with a completely new engine and with a modern frame and suspension”.

‘We wanted to produce a bike that appears old and original but with a completely new engine and with a modern frame and suspension,’ Giovanni says. To that end the frame and bodywork was completely designed in-house, drawing heavily from his father’s designs laid down years before. Over a year’s worth of R&D went into getting the geometry and suspension components spot on.

Like father, like son

The trickiest thing for the shop to overcome was something Arturo never had to tackle – hiding the racer’s plethora of wires, sensors and connectors that come with a newly manufactured, electronically-governed engine like the Brutale’s. ‘We had to find a place for the ECU. We also had to hide the fuel pump in the tank and all the electrical wiring so we don’t disturb the final look of the bike’. To that end, the team simply didn’t fit the ABS and traction control sensors present on the donor Agusta.

The end result of all this is a racer that has everything I’d ever want. It’s got historical provenance, it’s got a great big honking personality-driven engine neatly placed into a frame that’ll handle like all hell. And it looks absolutely exceptional. A fitting tribute to Arturo, and a worthy bike to carry the proud name Magni.

You’d be smiling too…

[ Magni MotorcyclesFacebookInstagram | Photos by Marc Holstein ]








  • This is a machine that can cause you dehydration from the never-ending drooling!!!

    • the watcher

      Or expulsion of any number of bodily fluids.

    • Spyker May

      I would licking it…

      Good one Geo 😉

  • the watcher

    Just needs lights to be perfect!

    • Marlon

      We’ll brace yourself – I believe they are making a run of them in lots of five. Some are equipped with lights. They cannot be registered in Italy but they have shipped them to various parts of the world where they can be taken on the road.

      • the watcher

        Oh. In that case they just need to be cheap. Ho hum.

    • I thought the same, but not for road use – more like a set of Italian Driving lights for those tough endurance road races. Yummy.

  • guvnor67

    Magni-ficent! Only a few hours ago I’d been watching Agostini and Hailwood on DVD and then this pops up. It sent the heart and mind racing, I can tell ya. Fantastic job!

  • Jonno Shakesby

    Stunning.

  • JeffH48

    Hmmm….Just an observation, but I’m extremely curious how the author, Marlon Slack., managed to _NOT_ include Mike ‘The Bike’ Hailwood in the pantheon of World Champion MV Agusta riders…Oh well….

    Oh yeah, I’d also demand the original style of exhaust, as seen above, on my Magni ‘MV replica’

    • Marlon

      Well in my mind (and this is entirely subjective) Read and Agostini dabbled other brands less, and with less success than their time at MV. I just think of them as more quintessential riders of the marque when compared to Hailwood, who won just about everything on everything! (Though he won, what, three or four GPs on the trot with Augusta?)

      • JeffH48

        Indeed, Mike was currently the “master”, IMHO, but Ago was coming on like gangbusters and I also believe that Count Giovanni Agusta really “wanted” an Italian rider to win the World Champion on his Italian built MV AGUSTA ! !

    • You are right. We’ll have him beaten immediately.

      • Bultaco Metralla

        A hundred lashes with a mink whip

        • JeffH48

          That’s a tad harsh…I was thinking maybe just a wet noodle… 🙂

    • Fido Zombie

      Swoopy pipes would be an excellent addition to this incredible bike.

  • martin hodgson

    You go away for a few days and this is what happens!!! What an incredible achievement in bike building. This is easily the best retro tech racer I’ve ever seen. It has all the beauty of the old with the mechanical magnificence of the new…. and there is just something about a triple that is special on its own.

    The Classic Suzuki Katana is amazing, so too the Irving Vincent, but nobody has ever really combined such a historic and famous looking machine with such new running gear and made it look like it’s meant to be. I’m in love!!!

    • guvnor67

      Yes, racing Triples, that sound, oh, that sound!!! Only beaten in spine-tingling aural delight by Hailwood’s Honda 6. Oh, stuff sleep, I’ll watch the DVD again!!

  • The Ogre

    Holy hell. I had no idea that Magni was doing bikes any longer. This thing is phenomenal.

  • Perfect in every way. Beautiful in design and execution. Fantastic!

  • Oh my god.