Bringing you the world's best café racers, bobbers and custom motorcycles

Racer


Honda CB350 – City of Hate Vintage Motorcycles

Posted on April 17th, by Andrew in Racer. 5 comments

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OK, maybe we’re slow or something, but apparently African Honey Badgers don’t give a shit. Now we hadn’t heard this before. That’s not to say that they spend their days watching cable TV and smoking weed. Hell no. Besides, their lack of opposable thumbs would make using a cigarette lighter almost impossible. See, these Honey Badgers are apparently renown for being totally and utterly fearless when it comes to fights. Whether it be snakes, birds of prey or even a lion – they’ll take it on without batting an eyelid. Now just imagine the Honey Badger is actually a bike builder named ‘Isiah’ and his fight was getting this bike ready for the 8th Annual Rockers versus Mods show in Dallas…

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‘63 Honda C110 – Dauphine-Lamarck

Posted on March 11th, by Andrew in Moped, Racer. 14 comments

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‘Jolie laide’ is a unique French expression that is often used to describe someone or something that is unconventionally attractive. The direct translation into English is ‘ugly beautiful’, but you’d be mistaken if you were to think that the phrase was a case of damning with feint praise. It’s been used in reference to some of the world’s most beautiful women, include Sofia Coppola and the remarkable Charlotte Gainsbourg. And today we’d like to use it in reference to something else rather remarkable. Meet the most ugly beautiful bike we think we’ve ever seen, Dauphine-Lamark’s unconventionally beautiful ‘69 Honda C110.

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2003 Triumph Bonneville Streetrod

Posted on March 3rd, by Scott in Café Racer, Racer. 36 comments

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The nickname ‘flying Scotsman’ comes to mind when describing Lindsay Young and his previous builds. Over the years, this Scottish Mechanical Engineer has built some super fast sports bikes. This time, he decided to build something a little more “sedate”. Not to say that this Bonneville Streedrod isn’t packed full of performance features – just not in the same league of break neck speed. So when Lindsay’s good friend was selling his stock 2003 Bonnie with only 3000 miles on the clock, Lindsay decided to try his hand at building his first classic styled ground up custom. “I did initially think of some sort of café racer but there are so many of them around and it’s all been done before many times over.” says Lindsay. “I wanted to do something a bit different and unique so my thoughts turned towards a retro style minimalist streetrod/streetfighter.” And so, the Streetrod was born – well, he still needed to do the work.

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1976 MV 750 Side Car Racer

Posted on January 24th, by Scott in Classic, Racer. 1 Comment

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Words by Ian Lee.

There are unique bikes. And there are ‘unique’ bikes. A unique bike will catch your eye in the street. The latter you won’t come across at any show, they are generally relegated to the confines of the computer screen or magazine cover. Today’s feature bike falls into the latter category. Definitely unique, this is a one off aerodynamic-as-hell racer with an Italian heart. Looking as good as it did when it rolled out of the workshop 34 years, this MV Agusta special is the first time a sidecar racer has graced the pages of Pipeburn.

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2008 Triumph Thruxton – ‘Steampunk Racer’ by BCR

Posted on December 22nd, by Scott in Café Racer, Racer. 1 Comment

Written by Ian Lee.

Speed hole:
(noun) a sometimes superfluous modification where a hole is drilled into an automotive accessory, denoting a sporting aspect in relation to the machine. See also; ‘awesome’.

Sometimes a bike appears in the Pipeburn inbox that is truly something special. A high level of work, thought, and time, create a truly magnificent motorcycle, the sort of machine that catches your eye and won’t let go. BCR’s latest project, the ‘Steampunk Racer’, is one such bike. A transformed Triumph Thruxton with a beautiful finish, nicely matched with tasteful performance mods. And speed holes as far as the eye can see.


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1981 Honda CX500

Posted on December 16th, by Scott in Brat, Racer. 1 Comment

The CX500 has had a bit of a resurgence over the last few years. Bike builders have seen their potential as a low cost donor motorcycle that has a great looking, reliable engine. We’ve seen them transformed into café racers, street trackers and even the odd bobber. But they almost always have one thing in common – Comstar wheels. Thanks to their shaft drive, rear drum set up it makes it very difficult to change the wheels, hence the reason they usually have the stock Comstars on them. So when Jerry Swanson was given his brother-in-law’s non running CX500 ‘parts bike’, changing the wheels was one of the many things he wanted to do. But first, he needed to get the weeds off it.


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Yamaha XJR1300 ‘Eau Rouge’ by Deus Ex Machina

Posted on November 6th, by Scott in Café Racer, Racer. 2 comments

Last year Yamaha started asking motorcycle customizers to provide inspirational ideas on how to transform modern Yamaha motorcycles into what they have dubbed ‘Yard Built Specials’. It’s only been a few months since Deus Ex Machina Italy launched their last ‘Yard Built’ Yamaha XJR1300 named Project X. Now they have just unveiled their latest take on the XJR1300 at the EICMA 2013 in Milan – the largest two-wheeled show in the world. Deus and Yamaha have collaborated to transform this powerful XJR1300 into something to behold. The ‘Eau Rouge’ is Deus Ex Machina’s modern interpretation of endurance racing bikes of the 70s and 80s – and what a wonderful interpretation it is.


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‘78 Moto Guzzi Le Mans I – Revival Cycles

Posted on November 3rd, by Andrew in Classic, Racer. No Comments

It’s hard to deny that Moto Guzzi hold a rather special place in the pantheon of motorcycles. They’re a whole lot cooler and unusual than your average Ducati. They’re definitely more passionate than most BMWs. And there’s little doubt that they can out-sport most Triumphs, even if it is by their looks alone. In what you could call a Lamborghini-esque niche, they seem to occupy that perfect world where collectable, beautiful and unusual intersect. Which makes a custom Guzzi even more of an impressive proposition. And when they’re done as well as the bikes that have been rolling out Austin’s Revival Cycles in recent years, it’s a wonder that the other shops haven’t given up and gone home. Meet their latest and quite probably their greatest, the ‘78 Le Mans Special.


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Armstrong-CCM 250 Speedster

Posted on August 27th, by Scott in Racer, Scrambler. No Comments

You always remember your first. And this CCM Motorcycle is the first of its kind to adorn the pages of Pipeburn. CCM (Clews Competition Machines) was a British motorcycle manufacturer that was formed in 1971 from what was left of BSA’s off-road competition team. They had a limited budget and bought all the left over spares from BSA to manufacturer their own motorcycles. This eventually became a successful business and were highly regarded as reliable machines. Thanks to a few merges it became Armstrong-CCM and for most of the 1980s they produced about 3,500 trails and motocross bikes. Today’s feature bike was one of those – although they probably didn’t imagine it would turn out like this.


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’75 Honda CR750 Yoshimura Special

Posted on August 24th, by Andrew in Classic, Racer. 1 Comment

Being a child of the 1970s, I fondly remember a few formative moments in my motorcycle education. SS Ducatis. The Fonz. Evel Knievel. And, most importantly, Mad Max. We’ve talked before about this Australian movie par excellence, and I don’t think it’s an overstatement to say that it not only represents a milestone in the history of movie making, but also in motorcycle trend-setting. In a way it crystallised the ascendance of Japanese motorcycles – something that had started over a decade before at the Isle of Man with Soichiro Honda and continued in the 70s with the legendary Honda Daytona wins. Suddenly, kids like me weren’t dreaming of riding Italian or English bikes, but instead a new generation of Far Eastern dream machines with their race-bred OHCs, in-line four blocks and new-school traditions. To me, this bike is everything a cool motorcycle needs to be. Black. Fared. Flat-backed. Bad-assed. Not moved? We suggest you check your pulse for signs of life and read on.


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