Bringing you the world's best café racers, bobbers and custom motorcycles


BMW R65 – Moto Adonis

Posted on October 12, 2015 by Andrew in Scrambler. 11 comments


From an old factory in the Dutch city of Roosendaal, Daan Borsje and his team at Moto Adonis share a common purpose of “building awesome vintage bikes”. Having shown they can build clean vintage customs with an impressive portfolio of both European and Japanese vintage machines, they decided to take a different path on this, their latest build. From the remains of an old Dutch Police Bike, a BMW R65, they have created a Neo-Utilitarian Scrambler that wouldn’t be out-of-place shredding the boggy fields on the Keutenberg or centre stage in a new Mad Max film. Stripped of all its law enforcement paraphernalia, the little BMW from the R range was taken back to bare bones to reveal the outlaw within.


‘87 BMW R65 – Ellaspede Customs

Posted on March 28, 2014 by Andrew in Brat. 12 comments


Perception is a funny thing. It can be the difference between a positive or negative outcome, between liking or not liking something or someone and often the cause of missed opportunities. To change perception usually takes a change of mindset or to be shown there may be more to something than meets the eye. Until recent years, BMW R-series bikes from the 1980s could have been considered in a similar light. A bike for old guys into function more than form. Solid, dependable, but neither exciting nor innovative. Or at least that was a guy called Bruce’s perception of them when he visited Brisbane’s Ellaspede Customs as a customer. But that was a view which was soon to change – especially after eyeing a certain R-series on a little site called Pipeburn.


BMW R65 – Hook Motors & Totti Motori

Posted on June 3, 2013 by Scott in Scrambler. 16 comments

Written by Ian Lee.

Solid. If I was going to use one word to describe the BMW R series bikes built in the 80’s, that is the word I would use. From all angles you can see it’s packing some bulk, even from the rear, with it’s horizontal heads sticking out wide. As today’s feature bike from Hook Motors shows, they also make a solid base for a scrambler type build, it’s aesthetic giving the idea that if you can’t find a way around, you could just wind on the throttle and punch your way through. Fat offroad tyres, exhaust & handlebars all give the effect of something you could take to the trails on a Sunday, and be able to ride it home afterwards with little issue. Or in the words of Hook Motors “Designed for hill or dirt roads alike, this special motorcycle feels light and manageable. This bike is meant to be ridden hard”. Amen to that.


1984 BMW R65 Café Racer – “The Wasp”

Posted on October 18, 2012 by Andrew in Café Racer. 39 comments

“Barn find,” they call them. And the ‘they’ in this case would be an American-dominated coalition of nations that do actually have barns. Which kind of leaves those in the world who don’t actually have barns as part of their local bucolic repertoire kinda in the lurch, don’t you think? Well, not being a nation of people who take these kind of things lying down, us Aussies refused to put up with second best and trumped the barn with a marvelous creation we call the “shed.” See, whereas a barn can contain many things that aren’t even remotely cool (take the humble yet smelly cow) the average Aussie shed will always have something cool it it. It’s the law in some states. Forget animals, ploughs, and nesting birds – sheds are much more likely to be inhabited with things like engine parts, bar fridges, welders and greasy tools. Oh, and BMW motorbikes, if Tony Botrall’s find is anything to go by…


1983 BMW R65 “Veille École”

Posted on August 8, 2011 by Andrew in Café Racer. 39 comments

Here’s something you may or may not know, depending on your own, personal level of smart-ass-ed-ness. The current BMW logo has been developed over many generations of refinement to the point it’s at today – the familiar circle divided into blue and white quadrants. But do you know where it started? Here’s where; as a white spinning propellor against a blue sky. That’s right, a propellor. Motorcycles were essentially a sideline for the company after the treaty of Versailles banned Germany from making arms in 1918. Talk about making the best out of a poor lot. So almost 100 years later we find ourselves in Sydney with a Frenchman pondering just how to trick up his ’83 R65. Then in a moment of divine inspiration, he realises exactly what he should do. Behold the world’s first BMW motorbike decorated in the colours of the French Airforce. Vive la différence!