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Suzuki


‘84 Suzuki GR650 – Anvil Motociclette

Posted on April 27th, by Andrew in Café Racer. 8 comments

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Want a quick and easy way to sort bikers into ‘buyers’ and ‘builders’? It’s easy – just talk about a tragically unpopular model. See, a buyer will judge a bike on its factory form. These are the guys that think showroom looks are somehow hard-wired into a bike’s DNA; the guys who will dismiss an entire model or range because they don’t like the size of the headlight or the shade of red on offer. Then there’s the builders. These are the guys who can see beyond the superficial to appreciate the soul of a bike, no matter how ugly it’s superficial, outward appearance. Italy’s Anvil Motociclette fancied themselves as the latter, and to test the theory they took on the challenge of customising the optimistically named Suzuki GR650 ‘Tempter’. It didn’t tempt us before, but it sure does now.

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‘80 Suzuki GN400 – Old Empire Motorcycles

Posted on April 2nd, by Andrew in Classic. 18 comments

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Written by Martin Hodgson

It’s what makes the scene such a creative outlet; no two customs will ever look the same. It’s a philosophy two British companies share and they decided to pool their talents to create a one-off masterpiece. Old Empire Motorcycles is no stranger to Pipeburn, having built “Typhoon” last year’s number two selection in the Bike of the Year Awards and they’ve teamed up with ODFU, a clothing company that specialises in small run, hand drawn designs. The result is a 1980 Suzuki GN400 that leaves the commuter class behind and enters the world of custom classics.

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2002 Suzuki TL1000R

Posted on January 17th, by Scott in Café Racer. 38 comments

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Written by Marlon Slack.

Incredibly, in stock trim the Suzuki TL1000R is as ugly as it is torquey. With its rounded, fat fairing and ungainly looking seat, in the bike symbolizes much of what was wrong with the late 90s – along with Balkan ethnic cleansing, mass flooding deaths in China and the rise of ska music. Nick O’Kane – powersports sales manager at K&N air filters – saw the potential hidden underneath all the bulbous plastic of a 2002 model TL and put together this gorgeous custom that looks great, handles beautifully and has the powerplant to match.

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Suzuki TR750 by Redonda Racing

Posted on November 17th, by Scott in Racer. 3 comments

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Being a self confessed fan of full fairings on vintage bikes and also a huge fan of the legendary Barry Sheene, this Suzuki TR750 was always going to resonate with me on many levels. It’s hard to believe that it has been over 10 years since the world of racing lost Barry Sheene. This stunning tribute bike has been built by a small shop in Portugal called Redonda. They specialize in building race bikes for the road, off-road and are also developing some interesting electric bikes. JP Barranca is the head honcho at Redonda and has had long career in the motorcycle industry. JP has a passion for all motorbikes but has a particular soft spot for vintage two strokes.

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Suzuki XF650 ‘Lady O’ by Vence

Posted on October 6th, by Scott in Scrambler. 14 comments

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Written by Ian Lee.

Forgotten sibling syndrome, it’s an issue which I’m sure some of us can relate to. Having to grow in the shadow that someone else’s limelight casts, with little view to catch attention. This in no different in the motorcycle world, with today’s feature bike an often overlooked stablemate to the ubiquitous DR650, but in the right hands shows it can offer a far superior option. Coming out of the Vence Prodigal workshop, this Suzuki XF650 Freewind has had a full makeover, with the final result leaving it’s sought after stablemate looking a little less desirable. With much pleasure we would like to introduce you to ‘Lady O’.

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1971 Suzuki T500 Titan

Posted on February 15th, by Scott in Café Racer, Classic. 17 comments

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Words by Martin Hodgson.

Martin is the newest member to the Pipeburn team. When Martin isn’t writing for numerous motorcycle and automotive magazines, he can be found either running his auto parts import business or in his workshop building café racers from bikes that usually have one wheel well and truly in the grave.

It was the era of the wild 2-strokes, from the mid-Sixties to the mid-Seventies; if speed was your thing then you couldn’t beat a screaming oil burner. But Suzuki took a slightly different approach, they combined what they’d learnt at the race track and produced a bike that was bullet fast but also reliable, the perfect street 2-stroke motorcycle, the classic Suzuki T500 Titan. Ralph Spencer had himself a gorgeous original example and motorcycle nirvana was his until…

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1987 Suzuki GSX400 S “Dented Brat”

Posted on October 28th, by Scott in Brat, Café Racer. 16 comments

Written by Ian Lee.

The Suzuki GSX twin. A plastic fantastic model from the 80s, with a timeless ability to look slightly uncool enough to inhibit a comeback. On the other hand, their ridiculously good engine build quality means that many a GSX has been dusted off, started happily, and ridden into the sunset. So how do you reconcile these two qualities? Capelo’s Garage, based in Oporto, Portugal has managed to do this, by breathing new life into a well parked 1987 GSX400, dubbed ‘the Dented Brat’. Nuno Capelo, the workshop’s founder, has built into it a dark metallic aesthetic that gives a big middle finger to the bike’s polyethylene clad beginnings, and shows the whole bike, scars and all.


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1988 Suzuki S40 Boulevard – Studio Motor

Posted on April 23rd, by Andrew in Bobber, Brat. 40 comments

It’s amazing what you can do with limited resources and a whole bunch of commitment; that’s got to be the mantra of Studio Motor’s Donny Ariyanto. He’s a builder that’s based in South Jakarta, and if there’s anyone in the world that will be able to make a mountain out of any anonymous, out-of-favour, ill-advised motorcycling mole hill, it’s this man. In the past he’s worked miracles on Yamaha Scorpios and Suzuki Thunders, but we’re thinking that he’s really outdone himself this time. Feast your eyes on Studio Motor’s latest single cylinder miracle, the “Naughty Red.”


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1979 Suzuki GS750 – Tin Shack Restorations

Posted on April 21st, by Andrew in Brat, Racer. 29 comments

It probably won’t surprise you to learn that many custom bike builders and shops sometimes also dabble with custom cars. Less café, more drive-in diner you might say. If you ever follow the links to the builders websites in the stories we post you’ll undoubtedly see the odd hot rod, classic Porsche, or muscle car lurking around in the background. But what did take us by surprise was the way Colby Morris of Tin Shack Restorations gets his four-wheeled kicks; he has a burning desire to bring old Land Rovers back from the dead. And if this is the kind of bike that gets made when these rubber boot and pheasant hunting types aren’t, er, pheasanting then it’s fine by us. Presenting ‘a series Land Rover and motorcycle hobby run amok,’ here’s a ’79 Suzuki GS750 they call the ‘Tin Shack Special.’


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1994 Suzuki DR650 Street Dracker – Blitz Motorcycles

Posted on April 3rd, by Scott in Scrambler. 24 comments

Written by Ian Lee.

The French always seem to be on the forefront of fashion. Clothes, perfume, and now custom motorcycles. Not that I pay much attention to the first two. The latest fashion in custom cycles appears to be to use a dirt bike as the base for a build. Rugged, simple design makes for an excellent platform to build on, they’re cheap as well, and the ability to get that big bore thumper note all add to the desirability. Blitz Motorcycles knows this, and has used this thinking to the best of their abilities to create a level of custom rarely seen, all from the starting point of a simple trail bike. It just makes sense, oui?


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