Bringing you the world's best cafe racers, trackers, scramblers, bobbers & custom motorcycles.

The Pipeburn team

Martin Hodgson

Martin Hodgson has been writing for automotive publications since 2000 to paying his way through an International law degree. But it’s a lifelong passion for pulling apart engines and sometimes even putting them back together. Since 2003 he’s spent time working for teams in the V8 Supercar championship, as well as production racing at the regional level. And when he’s not working legal cases, the professionally trained engine tuner is tweaking maps on race bikes or rebuilding motorcycles that most would have left to die.

Read Martin’s Posts >
Scott Hopkin

Scott got bitten by the bike bug at a very young age while riding little Honda CR80s on his uncle's farm. He graduated to bigger bikes before spotting a custom Yamaha SR400 on the side of the road in Bondi in 2008. From that moment on he knew he wanted to customise one. Hungry to find inspiration, he soon realised that there wasn't much online. This was the catalyst to start a custom bike blog late one night on New Year’s Eve, 2008. After sifting through a lot of names, he discovered Pipeburn.com was available and the rest is history.

Read Scott’s Posts >
Andrew Jones

Born and bred in Sydney's sunny southern beaches, Andrew soon realised that engines and electronics were much cooler than wax and board shorts. Spending his teenage holidays in the outback riding crappy farm bikes illegally on public roads only sealed the deal. Subsequently, Andrew has visited many countries riding and writing about bikes and has crashed in most of them as well. Hello to the Italian Carabinieri if they are reading this.

Read Andrew’s Posts >

Marlon Slack


Marlon’s first ride was a beaten up old four stroke held together with gaffer tape and burnt oil. Of great sentimental value (he’d traded a rifle for it) the first step in his customising career was riding it sideways into a tree and snapping it into two. Fourteen years later, his customizing abilities haven’t improved. A dyed-in-the-wool Yamaha nut, he firmly believes the 1978 SR500 represents the acme of motorcycle development and every bike produced since is merely derivative.

Read Marlons’ Posts >