Bringing you the world's best cafe racers, trackers, scramblers, bobbers & custom motorcycles.

Classic


Honda CB360T Café Racer

Posted on August 26, 2010 by Scott in Café Racer, Classic. 8 comments

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Rick Sanders started searching for a café racer donor bike at the beginning of 2010. “In the early spring I came across this red 1975 Honda CB360T bone stock, decent shape but not running, so on to the trailer it went” said Rick. You see Rick’s usual ride is a BMW R1100, so when he took on this project he wasn’t quite sure how it would turn out. “I’m no mechanic, but I can turn a wrench” he says. “Its amazing what people can create and conceive with motorcycles. Any café bike I was going to build was destined to have clip-ons or clubmans, so that became the starting point. Complete rewire of the front end, removed the gauges, bars, mirrors and turn signals. All that’s left up front is the new headlight and re-designed tach. I wanted drum brakes, so off with the rotors, calipers, hydraulics and levers. Each drum brake has its own custom made brake stops and MSR adjustable levers. Bar-end mirrors and machined aluminum bar plugs finish off the clip-ons.”

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Mooneyes Swap Meet

Posted on August 13, 2010 by Scott in Bobber, Classic. 3 comments

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These stunning photographs were recently captured at the 2010 Mooneyes motorcycle swap meet in Odaiba,Tokyo. Taken by the ‘Shimoyama Brothers’ from Japan who have an amazing collection of photos on their Flickr page. I particularly love the Ducati shot with that beautiful fairing – would be keen to see more pictures of this exquisite café racer.

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Deus New Zealand

Posted on July 28, 2010 by Scott in Café Racer, Classic, Other. 4 comments

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The city of Auckland is commonly known as the ‘City of Sails’ because there are more yachts in the harbour per capita than any other city in the world. After our recent visit to the impressive Deus store and workshop, I think they should rename Auckland the ‘City of Classic Motorcycles’. We were blown away by the number of beautiful bikes housed in this huge warehouse, from vintage Vincents and Husqvarnas, right through to brand new Triumphs and Harley Custom Bobbers. Incredibly this huge warehouse is only footsteps from the heart of the city – and dangerously close to the Sky City Casino. To find out where they are, hit the jump.

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1983 Muzeti 250

Posted on July 23, 2010 by Scott in Café Racer, Classic. 19 comments

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Never heard of a Muzeti motorcycle? Don’t worry, neither had we. You see, Murray Wilson is the proud owner and builder of the only Muzeti in the world. Murray (or Muz to his friends) completely rebuilt a 1983 GSX 250 Suzuki and decided to attach a badge with Muzeti on it – which is an extension of his nickname. “And lots of people have said to me, ‘Oh, I think I’ve heard of them’,” Murray says. “I didn’t want to go out and buy a brand-new bike, so I found one on eBay – a bargain at $300,” he said.

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Honda CB450 Phil Little Racing

Posted on July 21, 2010 by Scott in Café Racer, Classic. 3 comments

Spotted this stunning Honda CB450 café racer on Kneeslider the other day. The bike was built by Philip Little and was actually started many years ago. “I started this 1972 CB-450 café in 2003” Phil says. “It was to be a showcase bike for my CR450 body kit and hard parts. The bike’s completion, in 2010, came after the CR450 product line was purchased by Robert Ward of Concord, CA”.


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Kawasaki KZ1000 Café Racer

Posted on July 20, 2010 by Scott in Café Racer, Classic. 7 comments

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After yesterday’s ‘Mad Kwak’ article I thought it was appropriate to feature this monoshock Kawasaki green KZ1000 café racer which was recently a finalist on Do the Ton for ‘Bike of the Month’. Built by ‘backyard builder’ Andrew Lakowicz who told us “the bike was actually given to me by a relative, it had about 60,000 miles on it and was in a very rough shape”. Andrew did everything on this bike himself, including all the welding which he learned during the process. He is far from finished though, and already has a list of changes for his bespoke creation. “I actually just finished taking the swingarm off, as I am going to redo it. I am not too happy with the way it looks. My first stab at it was really an exercise in design and function, now I want to make it look more aesthetically pleasing”. The bike is well documented in it’s many stages, with numerous build threads (one, two, three, four, five, and six) on Do The Ton, showing how Andrew transformed this vintage bike into a beautiful monoshock café racer.

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Mad Kwaks

Posted on July 19, 2010 by Andrew in Classic, Video. 12 comments


Say the words “best ever motorbike film” to most riders, and you’ll probably hear them namedrop films like “The Wild One”, “Easy Rider”, or “On Any Sunday”. But there’s one that those in the know will tell you trumps them all when it comes to showing the insane rush of riding road bikes at speed; the original Mad Max movie from 1979.

Short on cash, George Miller (the film’s writer, director and co-producer who went on to make the Witches of Eastwick, Babe, and Happy Feet) enlisted the help of the Melbourne chapter of the Vigilantes outlaw motorcycle gang… as you do. Giving them access to free bikes and paying them mostly in beer, he let them loose on Victoria’s country roads and filmed the chaos. In the now infamous bridge scene, Vigilantes members were asked to drop and slide two Kawasaki KZ1000’s for the cameras. The riders, trying to get the best shot possible, stayed nice and close to the bikes after they hit the deck. The results? A tumbling 250kg bike comes damn close to breaking a gang member’s neck and the world gets one of the best bike stunt sequences ever filmed.


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1976 Honda CB100

Posted on July 10, 2010 by Scott in Brat, Classic. 7 comments

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It may not be the latest Wrenchmonkee creation but our friends at Hajarbroxx Motorcycles in Indonesia have achieved a similar look at a fraction of the cost. This low budget beauty all started with the purchase of a 1976 Honda CB100. The swing arm has been swapped with a Honda GL200, bigger tires and a custom Commando-style tailpiece have been added. The small displacement engine has been bored up with a much needed 200cc piston. All finished with a matte paint to achieve the raw look. You can check out the build process on the Hajarbroxx Facebook page.

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Joe’s V Cycle Café Racers

Posted on July 5, 2010 by Scott in Café Racer, Classic. 3 comments

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Joe from Joe’s V Cycle was employed in the airline industry for most of his career as a Lead Aircraft Technician. After numerous years maintaining and rebuilding Boeing and Airbus engines, Joe now spends his time building and restoring classic motorcycles. These beautiful bikes are just a taste of his recent handy work. The stunning blue Ducati is a 1966 Monza 250 and the green Honda is a 1972 cb750. “The Ducati and the CB750 were built this winter over about a 6 month period. Both were total overhauls with both engine and frame suspension plus all the custom work and parts. All the work was done in house except for powder coating and cad plating” says Joe. It’s definitely worth checking out Joe’s custom and restoration galleries.

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1959 Honda RC160

Posted on June 25, 2010 by Scott in Classic, Racer. 3 comments

This amazing illustration is by Japanese artist Kendge Seevert of a Honda RC160. Seevert is renowned for his highly detailed illustrations of motorcycles. Apparently the RC160 was never raced outside of Japan and was usually raced on Japanese unpaved roads, which explains why it was mostly shown without a fairing and with semi-knobbly tires. This is what Honda aficionado Joep Kortekaas says about this great looking racer “The Honda four, designated the RC160, had the same specifications as the 125cc twin, but the cylinders were now upright instead of being inclined, and the ignition was changed from magneto to battery with four coils. Claimed power output was 35 bhp at 13,000 rpm, with the same maximum engine speed of 14,000 rpm as the twin. The engine had a five-speed gearbox and weighed 58 kg. The cycle parts were nearly identical with the 125cc twin, the wheelbase being longer by 45 mm at 1310 mm, and the total weight of the bike was 124 kg”. You can read more about Honda and it’s racing history on vf750fd.com.


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