Bringing you the world's best cafe racers, trackers, scramblers, bobbers & custom motorcycles.

Racer


1930 Norton CS1 TT

Posted on December 21, 2010 by Scott in Classic, Racer. 12 comments

When the original Norton CS1 was released way back in 1927 it pretty much blew the socks off everyone. On its first race it won the Isle of Man Senior TT and also set the fastest lap time. This thing was like a superbike before the word even existed.

Marcel Schoen from the Netherlands is lucky enough to own the pictured 1930 CS1 TT. “It belonged to my late uncle and has been in the family for more then 50 years” said Marcel. Over the past few months Marcel has been busy rebuilding this classic motorcycle. He gave it a complete check over, new 20″ tires were fitted, the magneto was rewound and many original nuts and bolts sourced. It has a special 3 speed gearbox type N103, Webb 650 forks, the engine is a hybrid between a W.Moore and A.Carroll design.


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Triley Café Racer

Posted on October 28, 2010 by Scott in Café Racer, Classic, Racer. 11 comments

Found this exquisite machine on The Motart blog, which is run by Frank Sider – a man with great taste in motorcycles and other objects of desire. The bike was built by Frenchman Vincent Michel and is called a Triley. If you are wondering what a Triley is, it’s a combination of a Triumph 6T engine mounted in a Seeley frame. The Seeley frame is a legendary frame created by well known British builder and side car racer Colin Seeley.


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Eastern Creek Track Day, 2010

Posted on October 3, 2010 by Andrew in Racer. 2 comments

Let me tell you a story of horror and sadness. Sydney. A spring long weekend. A much-anticipated and expensive track day at Sydney’s premier racetrack. Then, on the drive out to the track, the heavens open and spill their horrible, grey wrath onto the earth in never-ending demonic sheets. Grown men wept and shook their damp, wrinkly fists at the sky.

I had grand plans for colourful action shots of speeding machinery and bitumen. Instead, I got a lens full of empty track and grown men in leather snoozing in fold-up chairs, $250 dollars out-of-pocket. I did my best – hopefully the shots have captured the essence of the day without making you want to slash your wrists. Please enjoy in a silent, respectful sort of a way.


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Kedo KCR500 CupRacer

Posted on July 27, 2010 by Scott in Racer. 6 comments

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If you’re the owner of a Yamaha SR500 or a XT500 then you have probably come across Kedo while searching for parts on the internet. They are based in Germany and have been sending motorcycle parts and accessories all around the world for over 15 years. We recently received their comprehensive catalogue in the mail and were impressed to see they have built this limited edition SR500 racing bike. Kedo’s press release says “10 years of racing experience went into building this race bike. Our objective was to get the maximum out of both engine and handling by using close-to-production material and no expensive special parts. However, at the same time, we would not accept any compromises regarding durability and practicality. The KCR500 is now built to order by Kedo as an exclusive low volume production. Together with many perfectly restored and modified genuine parts, lots of popular items from our product range are included. The engine is refurbished and tuned; the wheels and most cosmetics are all new. If it was not for the bones of this bike being at least 20 years old, you could easily label this bike as a quasi ‘brand-new’.” This ready to race KCR500 is being sold for 9.900 Euros or $12,800 USD and Kedo will only be building 5 of these impressive bikes.

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1959 Honda RC160

Posted on June 25, 2010 by Scott in Classic, Racer. 3 comments

This amazing illustration is by Japanese artist Kendge Seevert of a Honda RC160. Seevert is renowned for his highly detailed illustrations of motorcycles. Apparently the RC160 was never raced outside of Japan and was usually raced on Japanese unpaved roads, which explains why it was mostly shown without a fairing and with semi-knobbly tires. This is what Honda aficionado Joep Kortekaas says about this great looking racer “The Honda four, designated the RC160, had the same specifications as the 125cc twin, but the cylinders were now upright instead of being inclined, and the ignition was changed from magneto to battery with four coils. Claimed power output was 35 bhp at 13,000 rpm, with the same maximum engine speed of 14,000 rpm as the twin. The engine had a five-speed gearbox and weighed 58 kg. The cycle parts were nearly identical with the 125cc twin, the wheelbase being longer by 45 mm at 1310 mm, and the total weight of the bike was 124 kg”. You can read more about Honda and it’s racing history on vf750fd.com.


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Icon Death or Glory

Posted on June 20, 2010 by Scott in Other, Racer. 8 comments

It’s safe to say this drop seat rigid isn’t going to win any beauty contests. But then again it wasn’t built for that purpose. The Icon Death or Glory was built for one thing in mind – speed. One of the first thing that caught my eye was the plastic toy mirror, so I asked Icon’s design director Kurt Walter whether it was there to be ironic, he replied  “I built a 2100cc powered rigid death machine virtually incapable of turning or stopping yet equipped with Ohlins forks on billet Attack triples. Garnishing it with a mirror stolen from my daughter’s Barbie bike just seemed appropriate. So yeah, I suppose the mirror is – ironic, sarcastic, humorous, ridiculous, stupid… all of the above”.


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Bold MV Agusta Racer

Posted on June 10, 2010 by Scott in Classic, Racer. 2 comments

No it’s not the latest bike from Shinya Kimura, this blast from the past was originally featured in Australian Motorcycle News back in 1998 – which doesn’t feel like 12 years ago. Built by the talented Albert Bold of Bold Precision in Pennsylvania. Albert is well known for possessing bike building skills unmatched by many in the industry. Not many machinists can say they have turned cast-iron manhole covers into brake rotors like Albert has done in the past. Bold estimated that more than 2000 hours went into building this unique MV Agusta Racer. The reason being that he had a philosophy of no bolt-on parts if he could do it himself. “About the only corner I cut was the brake discs,” he said. “Those manhole covers worked great on the first bike, and the material was free – but I just couldn’t face the 40 hours of machining work to make each one, so this time I compromised and used Mercedes-Benz’ discs on the front, which I machined down to size, and a Subaru one from the local parts shop on the back.


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Curry Speed Club

Posted on May 27, 2010 by Scott in Classic, Racer. 3 comments

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The name might sound like an Indian fast food delivery service but the Curry Speed Club (CSC) is a group of vintage motorcycle enthusiasts in Japan who own auto/bike shops and race their restored Honda‘s at various tracks and events around Japan. The club is made up of many big names in the Japanese motorcycle industry including Maejima “Ted” Takeshi from Ted’s Special, the boys from M&M’s and the crew from Animal Boat just to name a few.

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BMW R80 Cafe Racer

Posted on May 24, 2010 by Scott in Café Racer, Racer. 13 comments

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After two blown engines Englishman Chris Simpson decided to try and squeeze a R80 RT engine into his 1979 BMW R45 frame. “The powers that be said the engine wouldn’t fit, as you can see it obviously does” Chris explains. “The only engine mods were a lightweight flywheel and the air box was removed and replaced with a Bellmouths. It has custom stainless 2-1 exhausts with a stainless megaphone, fully custom sub frame with hidden battery under the seat pod, a large EARLS oil cooler from a Ford Cosworth.

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Yamaha XS650 Café Racer

Posted on May 22, 2010 by Scott in Café Racer, Racer. 5 comments

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We love receiving emails from Ted at XS650chopper.com because he knows we get excited by Yamaha café racers. Frank Derris the owner and builder of this immaculate bike writes: “The concept was to blend old with new hence the crossover Yamaha racing paint scheme with the ton up stripe. I wanted the bike to handle and run as good as it could on tube tires and it does. I wanted to be able to look through the bike and see nothing but hard parts (no wiring, bolts or unsightly junk) 3 years of part time work. You judge the finished product.”

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